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Sunday, 28 May 2017

Russian tugs Bison (1980) and Bogatyr (1986)

Kronstadt, Russia, 23 May 2017

Bizon, Russia-flagged, homeport Bolshoy port of St. Petersburg, Russia, IMO 8853908, MMSI 273355460 and registration number 790060. Built by Tito Shipyard, Sremska Mitrovica, Yugoslavia [nowadays Serbia] with yard number 1037 on 31 March 1980. Ex-Bizon renamed 1992 and Bizonas renamed May 2012. Gross tonnage 281 tons, tonnage 84 tons, deadweight 76 tons, displacement 446 tons and as dimensions 32,07 (rule)-35,83 (over all) x 9,0 (moulded)9,3 x 4,5 (height) x 3,04 metres, Sped 13,2 knots. Owned by MTA Logistic Co. Ltd., Kronshtadt, Russia.

Bogatyr, Russia-flagged, homeport Bolshoy port of St. Petersburg, Russia, IMO 8725448, registration number 840490 and  MMSI 273445320. Built by Shipyard Yantar, Kaliningrad, Russia with yard number 808 on 22 January 1986. Gross tonnage 182 tons, net tonnage 54 tons, deadweight 69 tons, displacement 371 tons and as dimensions 27,0 (rule)-29,3 (over all) x 8,58 x 4,3 (height) x 3,4 metres. Speed 11,3 knots. Owned by MTA Logistic Co. Ltd., Kronshtadt, Russia. 

Russian tug Lookman 2014-


Kronstadt, Russia, 23 May 2017

Russia-flagged, homeport Bolshoy port of St. Petersburg, Russia, IMO 9729142, MMSI 273362790, registration number 130473 and call sign UBGM5. Built by Damen Shipyard Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands with yard number 512337 on 25 September 2014. In fact built in Romania. Gross tonnage 296 tons, net tonnage 89 tons, deadweight 110 tons, displacement 575 tons and as dimensions 27,9 (rule)-28,67 (over all) x 9,8 (moulded)-10,43 x 4,6 (height) x 3,7 metres. Speed 13,0 knots. Owned by Baltic Fleet Co. Ltd., St. Petersburg, Russia. 

Russian tug Persey 1991-


Kronstadt, Russia, 23 May 2017

Russia-flagged, homeport St. Petersburg or Vladivostok, Russia, IMO 8860535 and registration number 8860535. Built by Gorokhovets Shipyard, Gorokhovets, Russia with yard number 256 on 15 November 1991. Gross tonnage 182 tons, net tonnage 54 tons, deadweight 57 tons, displacement 360 tons and as dimensions 27,0 (rule)-29,3 (over all) x 8,24 (moulded)-8,6 x 4,3 (height) x 3,4 metres. Speed 11,5 knots. Owned by Publichnoe Aktionernoe Obshchestvo “Vladivostokskiy Morskoy Torgovyy Port”, Vladivostok, Russia. 

Russian tug (ex-Emil 1950-2002) Litke 2002-

Kronstadt, Russia, 23 May 2017

Russia-flagged, homeport Bolshoy port of St. Petersburg, Russia, IMO 8033716, MMSI 273449820, registration number 500255 and call sign UEWU. Built by STX Finland Turku, Turku, Finland with yard number 145 on 12 December1950. Ex-Emil renamed December 2002. Gross tonnage 195 tons, net tonnage 59 tons, deadweight 82 tons, displacement 317 tons and as dimensions 27,5 (rule)-30,5 (over all) x 7,7 x 4,1 (height) x 3,44 metres. Speed 14,0 knots. Owned by Kapita, LLC. St. Petersburg, Russia. 

German general cargo ship BBC Asia 2003-

Bremerhaven, Germany 21 May 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9266310, MMSI 304512000 and call sign V2OX4. Owned and managed by Briese Schiffahrt, Leer, Germany. Built by Xingang Shipbuilding Heavy Industry, Tianjin, China in 2003. 

Japanese car carrier City of Barcelona 1993-

Bremerhaven, Germany 21 May 2017

Isle of Man-flagged, Douglas, Isle of Man, IMO 9046368, MMSI 233234000 and call sign MRDP6. Built by Shin Kurushima Hirishima Dockyard, Higashihiroshima, Japan in 1993. 

British tug Svitzer Mallaig 2005-

Bremerhaven, Germany 21 May 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9317901, MMSI 244630133 and call sign PBJX. Built by Odense Steel Shipyard, Odense, Denmark with yard number 711 in September 2005. Owned and managed by Svitzer Marine, Middlesbrough, United Kingdom. Managed by Svitzer Europe Holding BV, Ijmuiden, Netherlands or by Svitzer Amsterdam, BV, Netherlands. Gross tonnage 385 tons, deadweight 226 tons and as dimensions 30,3 (over all)x 11,5 x 4,8 metres. 

Russian fortress Alexander at Kronstadt


Kronstadt, Russia 23 May 2017

Built in 1838-1845 under the supervision of engineer Carbonjer and Moris Dastrem in the Finnish Gulf. For the building was first the construction of an artificial island necessary. Bean/oval-shaped with as dimensions 90 x 60 metres were 4 combat floors available with totally 103 portholes for guns. On the roof of the fortress were another 34 guns projected. Accommodation for 1.000 military. On 27 July 1845 taken into service. Together with other fortress Alexander was to protect the south waterway towards St. Petersburg, Russia. After it lost it combat value in the 19th Century due to new kind of guns it was between 1897-1917 used as a research laboratory against the plague. 

Danish tug (ex-R. Catalyuna 2005-2016) Svitzer Vidar 2016-


Bremerhaven, Germany 21 May 2017

Denmark-flagged, IMO 9319181, MMSI 219022062 and call sign OXCW2. Also called fire fighting vessel. Gross tonnage 386 tons, deadweight 210 tons and as dimensions 29,50 x 11,00 x 6,80 metres. Speed 13 knots. Bollard pull 80 tons. According to maritime connector the Spain-flagged, homeport Barcelona, Spain,  tug R Catalunya, built by Astilleros Zamakona, Bilbao, Spain in 2005, MMSI 224149970 and owned and managed by Remolcadores Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Details confirmed by shipspotting adding call sign EALC. Launched on 11 February 2005. Delivered in 28 July 2005. Now of Svitzer’s Bjergning-Enterpreise A/S (Svitzer A/S), Esbjerg, Denmark. Original name Montras? 

Danish tug Svitzer Rota 2016-

Bremerhaven, Germany 21 May 2017

Denmark-flagged, IMO Denmark-flagged, IMO 9760859, MMSI 219285000 and call sign OXKT2. Gross tonnage 299 tons, deadweight 91 tons and as dimensions 23,10-24,74 x 12,63 x 4,60 x 3,20 metres. Speed 12 knots. Bollard pull 62 tons. Launched as the St. Vincent-flagged, homeport Kingstown as the Damen Gorinchem 545015 by Damen Song Cam Shipyard Ltd, Haiphong, Vietnam on 13 May 2016. Completed for Svitzer Europe Holding BV (Svitzer A/S), Esbjerg, Denmark on 5 September 2016 and transported with the Svenja towards Europe. 

Japanese bulk carrier Ultra Tatio 2016-

Kotka, Finland 15 May 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9782986, MMSI 538007122 and call sign V7VW8. Built in 2016. Owned by Proceed Shipping SA&Maki Kisen Co. Ltd. 

Panamanian bulk carrier IVS Naruo 2013-


Bremerhaven, Germany 21 May 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9692715, MMSI 373945000 and call sign 3FQ14Laid down by Japan Marine United Corporation, Kure Shipyard, (JMU), Tokyo, Japan as Japan Marine United Kure 2058 on 25 November 2013, launched on 26 September 2014 and delivered on 1 December 2014. Owned by Sun Harbor S.A., Panama and managed by Santoku Senpaku Co. Ltd. 

Dutch general cargo ship Deo Volente 2007-

Bremerhaven, Germany 21 May 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Urk, Netherlands, IMO 9391658, MMSI 246518000 and call sign PHFJ. Owned and managed by Hartman Seatrade, Urk, Netherlands. Built by Hoekman Shipbuilding, Urk, Netherlands in 2007. 

Saturday, 27 May 2017

Japanese light cruiser Yubari 1922-1944


Built under the 1917 8-4 Fleet Program, building ordered in October 1921, laid down by Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan as an experimental scout cruiser on 5 June 1922, launched on 5 March 1923, commissioned on 23 July 1923, modernized in begun 1944 and sunk by the American submarine USS Bluegill off Palau on 28 April 1944. Designed by the Japanese top naval architect Yuzuru Hiraga (ending his career as vice admiral)and lieutenant commander Fujimoto Kikuo.

Displacement 2.890 (standard design)-3.141 (full load design)-4.075 (full load actual) and as dimensions 138,90 x 12,04 x 3,58 metres or 455.9 x 39.6 x 11.9 feet. The machinery consisted of 3-shaft geared steam turbines and 8 Kampon boilers supplying 57.740hp allowing a speed of 35,5 knots and with a speed of 14 knots a range of 5.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 328 men. Armament (original) consisted of 2x2&2x1-14cm/5.5” cal 50 3rd Year Type naval guns, 1-8cm cal 40 3rd Year type naval gun, 2-7,7mm machineguns and 2x2-61cm/24” type 93 torpedo launchers for which 8 torpedoes were available. In 1944 consisted the armament of 2x2-14cm/5.5’ 50cal 3rd Year Type naval gun, 1-12cm/4.7” cal 45 10th Year Type naval gun, 6x2&1x32,5cm/0.98” Type 96 anti aircraft guns, 4-61cm/24” Type 93 torpedo launchers for which she carried 8 torpedoes and 2 depth charge launchers. The armour consisted of a 3,8cm/1.5” thick belt, a 2,5cm/0.98” thick deck and with the turrets protected by 2,5cm/0.98”. 

Japanese heavy cruiser Kinugasa 1924-1942

Aoba

Part of the Aoba-class consisting of the Aoba and Kinugasa, which originally were to be part of the Furutaka-class heavy cruisers, but both ships were of a modified design although with stability problems. Built under the 1923 Fiscal Year, laid down by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Kobe, Japan on 24 October 1924, launched on 24 October 1926, commissioned on 30 September 1927, added to the reserve in September 1937, modernized at the Sasebo navy Yard, decommissioned end 1940 and sunk off Rendova Island by US navy aircraft during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal on 13 November 1942.

Displacement 8.300 (standard)-9.000 (at last) tons and as dimensions 185,17 x 15.83 (original)-17,56 (at last) x 5,71 (original)-5,66 (at last) metres or 607.6 x 51.11-57.7 x 18.9 x 18.7 feet. The machinery consisted of 4-shaft Brown Curtis geared turbines and 12 Kampong boilers supplying 102.000 shp allowing a speed of 33,43 knots and a range with a speed of 14 knots of 7.000 (original)-8.223 (at last) nautical miles. Crew numbered 643-657 men. The armour consisted of 7,6cm/3” thick belt, 3,5cm/1.4“ thick decks, 4,8cm/1.9“ thick upper decks, magazine protected by 5,1cm/2“ thick armour and the gun turrets by 2,54cm/1“ thick armour. The conning tower was not protected! The original armament consisted of 3x2-20cm/7.9” 50 cal guns, 4x1-12cm/4.7” 45 cal guns, 6x2-61cm/24” torpedo tubes. Final armament consisted after 1940 3x2-20,3cm/8” 50 cal guns, 4x1-12cm/4.7” 45 cal guns, 2x4-61cm/24” torpedo tubes and 50-2,5cm/1” anti aircraft guns. Could carry 1 (original)-2 (after 1940t) floatplanes with her and was in a later stadium fitted out with  a catapult.

Japanese heavy cruiser Aoba 1924-1947

Aoba

Part of the Aoba-class consisting of the Aoba and Kinugasa, which originally were to be part of the Furutaka-class heavy cruisers, but both ships were of a modified design although with stability problems. Built under the 1923 Fiscal Year, laid down by Mitsubishi shipyards, Nagasaki, Japan on 23 January 1934, launched on 25 September 1926, commissioned on 20 September 1927, modernized by Sasebo Navy Yard between 1938-1940 included rebuilding bridge and adding bulges to improve her stability, heavily damaged by the American submarine USS Bream and American air attack on Cavite Navy Yard, Philippines on 23 respectively 29 October 1944, after 12 December 1944 unworthy to be repaired, sunk in the harbour during an American air attack at Kure, superstructure still above the water and now used as an-aircraft battery, heavily damaged during following American air attacks, stricken on 20 November 1945 and broken up between 1946-1947.

Displacement 8.300 (standard)-9.000 (at last) tons and as dimensions 185,17 x 15.83 (original)-17,56 (at last) x 5,71 (original)-5,66 (at last) metres or 607.6 x 51.11-57.7 x 18.9 x 18.7 feet. The machinery consisted of 4-shaft Brown Curtis geared turbines and 12 Kampong boilers supplying 102.000 shp allowing a speed of 33,43 knots and a range with a speed of 14 knots of 7.000 (original)-8.223 (at last) nautical miles. Crew numbered 643-657 men. The armour consisted of 7,6cm/3” thick belt, 3,5cm/1.4“ thick decks, 4,8cm/1.9“ thick upper decks, magazine protected by 5,1cm/2“ thick armour and the gun turrets by 2,54cm/1“ thick armour. The conning tower was not protected! The original armament consisted of 3x2-20cm/7.9” 50 cal guns, 4x1-12cm/4.7” 45 cal guns, 6x2-61cm/24” torpedo tubes. Final armament consisted after 1940 3x2-20,3cm/8” 50 cal guns, 4x1-12cm/4.7” 45 cal guns, 2x4-61cm/24” torpedo tubes and 50-2,5cm/1” anti aircraft guns. Could carry 1 (original)-2 (after 1940t) floatplanes with her and was in a later stadium fitted out with  a catapult. 

Keels laid down of British cruisers HMS Minotaur and Polyphemus according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the magazines Marine Rundschau dated November 1934 and N.M.R. dated 1 November 1934 reporting that 18 months after the budget for the building was approved, the keels were laid down of the British cruisers Minotaur (1) and Polyphemus (2) by Vickers-Armstrong, Walker-on-Tyne, England. Commonly was believed that the main armament would consist of 12-15-5.9”cm guns.

Notes
1. Of the Town-class light cruisers. Laid down by Vickers Armstrong on 4 October 1934, renamed Newcastle, launched on 23 January 1926, commissioned on 5 March 1937, decommissioned in 1958 and sold to be broken up in August 1959. The main armament was 4x3-15,2cm/6" guns.
2. Of the Town-class light cruisers. Laid down by John Brown&Company, Clydebank, Scotland on 21 November 1934, renamed Southampton, launched on 10 march 1936, commissioned on 6 March 1937 and sunk after a German air attack off Malta on 11 January 1941. The main armament was 4x3-15,2cm/6" guns. 

British light cruiser HMS Galatea launched according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Schiff dated 1 October 1934 that the British 5.200 ton light cruiser Galatea was launched on 9 August 1934. Dimensions 146,3 x 15,55 x 4,22 metres. The armament consisted of 6-15,2cm/5.98” guns, 4-10,2/4”cm guns, smaller anti aircraft guns and 6-53,3cm/20.09” torpedo tubes. To carry one plane for which she was fitted out with a catapult. Part of the bulkheads and lower decks were electrically welded. Machinery consisted of 4 turbines situated in 2 engine rooms delivering 54.000hp and 4 Yarrow boilers with super heaters and 24,25 atmosphere also divided over 2 boiler rooms. A similar although separate boiler was to be used as donkey boiler when she was lying in the harbour. Four screws at full speed turning 350rpm.(1)

Note
1. Laid down by Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Greenock, Scotland on 2 June 1933, launched on 9 August 1934, commissioned on 14 August 1935 and sunk by the German submarine U-557 off Alexandria, Egypt on 14 December 1941. Of the Arethusa-class. 

Thais drilling jack up (ex-Dyvi Epsilon 1981-1987, Neddrill 7 1987-1997, Noble Piet van Ede 1997-2014) Paragon C462 2014-



Harbour Den Helder, Netherlands 23 May 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 8752805, MMSI 636011818 and call sign AbB06. Ex-Dyvi Epson renamed January 1987, Neddrill 7 renamed January 1997 and Noble Piet van Ede renamed August 2014. Built by Constructions Industrielles de la Mediterranee, La Seyne sur Mer, France in 1981. Owned and managed by Paragon Asset, Phuket, Thailand. As Neddrill 7 chartered y NAM (50/50 Exxon/Shell) and active in the Frisian Front, North Sea. Neddrill was a subsidiary of Nedlloyd. Gross tonnage 6.890 tons, deadweight 15.170 tons and as dimensions 55,4 x 58,23 metres. In 2015 overhauled at Den Helder. Designed by the Dutch engineers office marine Structure Consultants (MSC) and built for account of the Norwegian drilling firm Dyvi. In 1996 sold to the American contractor Noble Drilling. 

Dutch standby safety vessel (ex-Bukkeskjell 1971-1982, Trond 1982-1984, Donn Hugin 1984-1992, Stril Clipper 1992-2008, Ramco Clipper 2008-2009) Glomar Commander 2009-


Harbour Den Helder, Netherlands 23 May 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 7104996, MMSI 370667000 and call sign HP9956. Ex-Bukkeskjell renamed January 1982, Trond renamed January 1984, Donn Hugin renamed February 1992, Stril Clipper renamed December 2008 and Ramco Clipper renamed October 2009). Owned and managed by Glomar Shipmanagement, Den Helder, Netherlands. Built by Storviks Mekaniske Verksted, Kristiansund, Norway in 1971. 

Dutch ferry Texelstroom 2014-

Leaving Den Helder, Netherlands towards Texel, Netherlands 23 May 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Oudeschild, Netherlands, IMO 9741918, MMSI 244870335 and cal sign PE9877. Laid down by La Naval del Norte, Bilbao, Spain oin December 2014, launched on 30 July 2015 and completed by Damen Shipyard BV, Amsterdam, Netherlands on 18 February 2016. Owned and managed by Teso BV (Texels Eigen Stoomboot Onderneming), Den Hoorn, Netherlands. 

Norwegian offshore supply ship Island Empress 2007-


Den Helder, Netherlands 23 May 2017

Norway-flagged, homeport Aalesund, IMO 9390666, MMSI 2585440000 and call sign LAJI3. Owned and managed by Island Offshore Management, Ulsteinvik, Norway. Built by Vard Braila, Braila, Romania in 2007. 

Friday, 26 May 2017

British destroyer HMS Redoubt (1916) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by Doxford&Sons, Sunderland, England in 1916, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Skate (1917) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by J. Brown&Co., Clydebank, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Urchin (1917) in 1923

Admiralty M.R. class. Launched by Palmer’s Co., Hebburn, England in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.085 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Ursa (1917) in 1923

Admiralty M.R. class. Launched by Palmer’s Co., Hebburn, England in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.085 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Tower (1917) in 1923

Admiralty M.R. class. Launched by Swan, Hunter and Wigham Richardson, Wallsend-on-Tyne, England in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.085 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Trenchant (1916) in 1923

Admiralty M.R. class. Launched by J.S. White&Co., Cowes, Wight in 1916, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.085 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Telemachus (1917) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by J. Brown&Co., Clydebank, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 1x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Redgaunlet (1916) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by Denny Brothers, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1916, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Tetrarch (1917) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by Harland&Wolff, Govan, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Rowena (1916) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by J. Brown&Co., Clydebank, Scotland in 1916, commissioned in 1916, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Romola (1916) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by J. Brown&Co., Clydebank, Scotland in 1916, commissioned in 1916, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Restless (1916) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by J. Brown&Co., Clydebank, Scotland in 1916, commissioned in 1916, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Rigorous (1916) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by J. Brown&Co., Clydebank, Scotland in 1916, commissioned in 1916, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Rocket (1916) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by Denny Brothers, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1916, commissioned in 1916, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Rob Roy (1916) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by Denny Brothers, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1916, commissioned in 1916, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Undine (1917) in 1923

Admiralty M.R. class. Launched by Fairfield&Co., Govan, Scotland, in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.085 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Ursula (1917) in 1923

Admiralty M.R. class. Launched by Scott’s Co., Greenock, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.085 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Tempest (1917) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by Fairfield Co., Govan, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 8-3&@2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Tenacious (1917) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by Harland&Wolff, Govan, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 8-3&@2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Tancred (1917) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by W. Beardmore&Co., Dalmuir, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Satyr (1917 ) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by W. Beardmore&Co., Dalmuir, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Sharpshooter (1917) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by W. Beardmore&Co., Dalmuir, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British destroyer HMS Tarpon (1917) in 1923

Admiralty R. class. Launched by J. Brown&Co., Clydebank, Scotland in 1917, commissioned in 1917, displacement 1.065 tons, horsepower 27.000hp, oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns, 6-2pd guns and machineguns and 2x2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British offshore crew tender Marineco Mariah 2011-

Inner harbour Den Helder, Netherlands 23 May 2017

United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9638240, MMSI 235089035 and call sign 2EXU3. Built by Damen Shipyard Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands in 2011. Of Marineco UK Ltd. 

British offshore crew tender Marineco Dignity 2012-


Inner harbour Den Helder, Netherlands 23 May 2017

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Leith, IMO 9654543, MMSI 235091371, official number 918297 and call sign 2FHQ9. Built by Damen Shipyard Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands. Of Marineco UK Ltd. 

Dutch tug (ex-Picor 1921-1929, Elta 1929-1965, Dolfijn 1965-1977) Gar 1977-

Inner harbour Den Helder, Netherlands 3 May 2017

ENI 2508946 and EU 2003138. Built by Rijnstroom, Leiden, Netherlands in 1921. Dimensions 16,17 x 3,50 x 1,80 metres and 6 tons. One 150hp Werkspoor engine. Ex-Picor of C.J.L. Berk&P. Baljet, Amsterdam, Netherlands and 1923 of C.J.L. Berk, renamed Elta in 1929 of W.L. van Bentum, Amsterdam, renamed Dolfijn in 1965 of J.C. Botter, Amsterdam and since 1977 the Gar of D. Uitzetter, Amsterdam. Dutch tug (ex-Picor 1921-1929, Elta 1929-1965, 

Taiwan bulk carrier Tao Mariner 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 22 May 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9487574, MMSI 356158000 and call sign 3FBK. Built by Murakami Hide Shipbuilding, Imabari, Japan in 2010. Owned and managed by Well Shipmanagement&Maritime Consultant, Taipei, Taiwan. 

Chinese bulk carrier (ex-Aktor II 2010-2011) Promise 3 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 22 May 2017

Hong Kong/China-flagged, IMO 9571404, MMSI 477814700 and call sign VRHZ5. Owned by Promy 3 Limited Group, Hong Kong, China and managed by Fleet management Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Laid down by Samho Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Tongyoung, South Korea with yard number SH1225 on 12 April 2010, launched on 28 July 2010 and delivered on 22 October 2010. Liberia-flagged 25 October 2010-23 January 2011 as Aktor II, Hong Kong-flagged 23 January 2011 as Promise 3 and again Liberia-flagged 23 January 2011-28 January 2011 as Aktor II and then again Hong Kong-flagged. 

Danish oil/chemical tanker (ex-Sakarva 2008-2014) Ternvind 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 22 May 2017

Denmark-flagged, homport Skagen, Denmark. IMO 9425356, MMSI 2919554000 and call sign OWT2. Ex-Sakarya renamed April 2014. Owned by Tarntank Rederi, Skagen, Denmark and managed by Tarntank Shipmanagement, Donso, Sweden. Built by Dearsan Shipyard, Istanbul, Turkey in 2008. 

Thursday, 25 May 2017

Japanese gunboat Yayeyama launched according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated 1889 no. 1-2


An item referred to the Army and Navy Gazette reported that in January at Yokosuka, Japan the steel built gunboat Yayeyama was launched. With a displacement of 1.800 tons were her dimensions 96 x 10,5 x 4,7 (hold) metres. The horizontal triple expansion engine was to deliver 5.400 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. The planned armament was 3-12cm guns, 6 machineguns and 2 torpedo tubes.(1)

Note
1. Also called corvette or unprotected cruiser because of her being so little. Designed under supervision of Emile Bertin. Building ordered under the 1885 Fiscal Year, laid down at the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, Japan in June 1887, launched in March 1889, completed on 15 March 1890, after 1905 used as test ship in developing new boilers and broken up  and 1 April 1911.

Dutch cutter (ex-Doggersbank 1992-1997, Marijtje 1997-2011, Jelle Ras 2011-2014) Evert Snoek (SC-25) 2014-


Den Helder, Netherlands 23 May 2017

Germany-flagged, IMO 9044774, MMSI 211245890 and call sign DIRE.
Built by Scheepswerf Maaskant, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1992. Ex-Doggersbank renamed January 1997, Marijtje renamed February 2011 and Jelle Ras renamed 2014 Bought in summer 2014 by Gebroeders Snoek (from Urk, Netherlands) of SFB Hecht, Urk as the German ‘boomkor’ cutter. Originally to became a Belgian ship but became the England-flagged cutter GY217 and the German flagged cutter SC-25. Homeport in 2015 Büdum. 

British corvette HMS Carnation 1939-1943 and 1944-1948, Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Friso (K00) 1943-1944

As the Hr.Ms. Friso. Model Marinemuseum Den Helder, Netherlands

Laid down as the HMS Carnation at Grangemouth Dockyard Co., Grangenouth, England on 31 October 1939, launched on 8 July 1940, commissioned on 16 October 1940, and lend-lease by the British Royal Navy to the Royal Netherlands Navy between 26 March 1943-4 October 1944, laid up, sold on 31 March 1940, became the merchant ship Southern Lauren and broken up at Stavanger, Norway in 1966. Used by the Royal Netherlands Navy for escort service on the Atlantic Ocean and in the Mediterranean. Flower-class corvette.

Displacement 925 tons and as dimensions 62,48x 10,1 x 4,4 metres. Crew numbered 95 men. The horsepower of 2.750hp delivered by 1-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engine allowed a speed of 16 knots. With a fuel oil bunker capacity of 240 ton and 10 knot speed was her range 5.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of 1-10,2cm Mk9 Low Angle gun, 4-4cm anti aircraft pom pom guns, 2-2cm Oerlikon machineguns and 1 depth charge launcher. 

Dutch minelayer Hr. Ms. Willem van der Zaan 1938-1970


Laid down by Nederlandse Droogdok Maatschappij, Amsterdam, Netherlands on 18 January 1938, launched on 15 December 1938, commissioned on 21 August 1939, served also in the Dutch East Indies in and aft the Second World War, rebuilt as a frigate (F824) in 1950, accommodation and repair ship for the mine service at Vissingen, Netherlands since begin 1961, new pennant A880 since September 1963, decommissioned on 27 February 1970 and sold to Stolk’s Handelsonderneming, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up on 6 October 1970.

With a displacement of 1.422 tons and as dimensions 75,25 x 11,2 x 3,4 metres or 246.11 x 36.9 x 11.2 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 triple expansion steam engines and 2 Yarrow boilers supplying 2.200 ihp allowing with the 2 screws a speed of 15,5 knots. Her crew numbered 140 men. The armament consisted of 2-12cm/4.7” guns, 4-4cm guns and 4-12,7mm/0.50” machineguns and 120 mines. 

Building of Austrian cruiser HMAS Brisbane delayed to deficient navy yard at Cuckatoo, Australia according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that the prime minister of the Australian Commonwealth stated that already 21.750.000 francs were spent for buying and establishing the naval arsenal at Cuckatoo, Australia. Further more that it was impossible was to built the cruiser Brisbane without a complete renewal of the instrument of the yard. The result was a delay in building this cruiser of 3 years and extraordinary expenses of 8.750.000 francs.(1)

Note
1. Laid down at Cockatoo Island Dockyard, Sydney, Australia on 25 January 1913, launched on 30 September 1915, commissioned on 31 October 1916 and sold to be broken up in 1936. Town-class subclass Chatham design light cruisers. 

Germany built new shipbuilding test basin according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that at Hamburg, Germany a new shipbuilding test basin was built of which the basin had a length of more as 330 metres, one part with a width of 8 metres and 6,5 metres depth and the remaining part with a width of 16 metres and a depth of 7,5 metres. In the smaller part were the experiments with the models executed in the manner as was done in the past. In the broader part were models fitted out with own screws and propulsion. The maximum length of the models was 11 metres and the speed 40 miles. It was possible to calm down the waving water immediately after the test making it possible to execute more as 100 tests every day in each of the parts which were separated due to using locks. 

German salvage steamship Albatross salvaged partsof the sunk German torpedo boat S 178 according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that the German salvage steamship Albatross salvaged from the wreck of the German torpedo boat S 178 a still in good condition torpedo gun with torpedo and searchlight of which even the mirror was undamaged. 

In the USA submarine tested with screws fixed at the front side according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 6

An item reported that at Long Beach, USA a submarine with the dimensions 23 x 2,3 metres was tested with the screws fixed at the front side. Fitted out with 2-120hp gasoline engines also for the submerged propulsion and for which gas cylinders were available containing 1.000 cubic metres air. A submerged speed of 17-18 miles was claimed. 

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Samarang recommissioned in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1886-1887 no. 6

Zr. Ms. Samarang

An item reported that at the navy establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies in 1885 the Zr. Ms. Samarang of the Indies Military Navy lying in conservation was repainted, fitted out for service and commissioned on 11 January.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 4th class call sign GQTK, on stocks at the shipyard of the Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij, Fijenoord, Rotterdam, Netherlands in 1875, launched in 1876, commissioned on 16 October 1876, decommissioned on 1 November 1893, condemned and sold at the navy establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies on 10:00 o’clock on Saturday 21 April 1894 but Saturday 29 September 1894 again offered for sale. Dimensions 45,00 (between perpendiculars)-53,60 (over all) x 9,00 x 3,60 metres, displacement of 853 tons, horsepower 90 nhp.460 ehp. Speed 10 miles, a crew numbering 76 Europeans and 28 natives and an armament consisting of 1-18cm rifled gun and 2-12 cm KA. guns to which later 1-7,5cm A gun and 2-12cm K.A. were added. Wood planked iron built frame and zinced. 

Dutch paddle steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Banka docked at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1886-1887 no. 6

An item reported that at the navy establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies in 1885 the Zr. Ms. Banka of the Indies Military Navy was docked, cleaned and painted with Rathjens paint.(1)

Note
1. Paddle steamship 3rd class, call sign GQDB, iron-built, on stocks at the shipyard of the Kon. Fabriek etc., Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1866, launched in 1867, decommissioned on 18 August 1886, converted into a pilot station ship for the Oostervaarwater of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies as replacement of the Timor, displacement 1.070 tons, dimensions 52,9 x 8,8-15,28 (over paddle wheels) x 5,6 metres, horsepower 200 hp, an armament of 2 medium 30pd guns and 2-rifled 16cm guns and a crew numbering 100-122 men (1885: 92 Europeans, 30 natives). 

Machinery of Dutch ram turret Zr. Ms. Prins Hendeik der Nederlanden repaired at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1886-1887 no. 6


Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original source

An item reported that the navy establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies in 1885 assisted when the cranks of the Zr.Ms. Prins Hendrik der Nederlanden were taken out and further more were small repairs of boats and inventory parts done.(1)

Note
1. Ram turret, call sign GQRS, laid down at Laird, Birkenhead, England in August 1865, on launched 9 October 1866, commissioned on 1 May 1866, in 1901 transferred to the Department of Colonies. In 1905 given back and used as ammunition ship. Building costs ƒ 1.805.169,82. Iron-built, Dimensions 70,14 x 13,32 x 5,70 metres and a displacement of 3.375 tons. Her 2 engines and 4 boilers delivered 2.426 ihp which made with 2 screws a speed of 12,09 miles possible. Also fitted out with 3 masts and a sail area of 1.554m2, but sailed worse. Armed with 4-23cm rifled guns and 4-12cm guns. Armour sides was 115mm. Her crew numbered 230 men. Laid design based on ideas of the British navy captain Coles but altered according to remarks of the Dutch naval chief engineer B.J. Tideman. In 1875 destined for the service in the Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Leeuwarden laid up at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1886-1887 no. 6

An item reported that the Zr. Ms. Leeuwarden in 1885 was decommissioned at the navy establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies and laid up in conservation. Inventory parts were repaired and the ship kept dry by pumping.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GQMN, on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands, Netherlands on 6 December 1859, launched on Saturday 13.30 o’clock 19 October 1861, condemned 1886, decommissioned on 20 September 1885 and sold at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for ƒ 26.050 on 23 January 1886, dimensions 58,00-62,84 (over all) x 12,25 x 5,50 metres, 2.030 tons displacement, an armament of 10 guns (10 rifled 16cm guns, 1881: 6-12cm guns, 4 rifled 16cm guns), a crew numbering 212-225 men, 8,5 knots speed and 250 hp horsepower. 

Monday, 22 May 2017

Hong Kong-flagged bulk carrier Darya Kirishna 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 May 2017

Hong Kong-flagged, IMO 9728370, MMSI 477045400 and call sign VRQT9. According to marinetraffic the Audrey Tracy although AIS claimed Darya Kirishna.
Built as the Liberia-flagged Namura 389 by Namura Shipbuilding, Imari, Japan in 2016. 

Marshall Islands-flagged bulk carrier Alberto Topic 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 May 2017

Marshall islands-flagged, IMO 9728473, MMSI 538006286 and call sign V7LK7. Built as the Liberia-flagged Namura 402 by Namura Shipbuilding, Imari, Japan in 2015. 

British oil/chemical tanker Bow Cardinal 1997-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 May 2017

Norway International Register-flagged, homeport Bergen, Norway, IMO 9114244, MMSI 259830000 and call sign LADQ5. Owned by Odfjell, London, United Kingdom and managed by Odfjell Asia, Singapore. Built by StX Norway Floro, Floro, Norway in 1997. 

Bermudian crude oil tanker Front Cougar 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 May 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9686649, MMSI 538006608 and call sign V7NP6. Owned by Frontline 2010, Hamilton, Bermuda and managed by Frontline Management, Oslo, Norway. Built by Longxue Shipbuilding, Guanzhou, China in 2016. 

German bulk carrier (ex-BBC Pluto 2010) BBC Neptune 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 May 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9537264, MMSI 636092012 and call sign A8VJ6. Ex-BBC Pluto renamed August 2010. Owned and managed by Briese Schiffahrt, Leer, Germany. Built by Xingang Shipbuilding Heavy Industry. Tianjin, China in 2010. 

Danish oil/chemical tanker (ex-Amy 2007-2008) Nordic Hanne 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 May 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9340128, MMSI 564520000 and call sign 9V2536. Ex-Amy renamed January 2008. Owned and managed by Nordic Shipholding, Hellerup, Denmark. Built by Guangzhou International Shipyard, Guangzhou, China in 2007.