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Monday, 24 July 2017

The Bulgarian navy and the harbour of Varna, Bulgaria according to a Dutch naval report in 1926


The Dutch coastal defence ship Hr. Ms. Tromp (1) commanded by captain N.J. van Laer left on 6 October 1926 Nieuwediep, Netherlands for a voyage towards the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. One of the visited harbours was Varna, Bulgaria. In the morning of 5th November just north of the Bay of Busghar was she passed by four Bulgarian torpedo boats (2), the first one showing a kind of command flag although none of the boats showed any vane. They saluted the Tromp behaving like torpedo boats while they were in fact not regarded the peace regulations.(3) The Dutch commanding officer supplied some details about the town of Varna. Since the war decreased the merchant shipping considerable and the Bulgarian cabinet seemed to support the harbour of Boergas. Water could be bunkered along the quay buts as the Tromp was lying outside the actual harbour and no water prow available was she forced to distillate herself the water to provided the need of fresh water. Good quality of bunker coal was not available. The government mines delivered a kind of brown coals of 5.000-6.0000 calories. The consumption was extremely high and warned for the great risk of brewing and advice not to buy. On the 11th was Varna left.

The Dutch commanding officer supplies some details about the Bulgarian navy and some harbour. In Varna were some old torpedo boats lying, part of a no longer war fleet but of what was called a gendarmerie military headed by a former navy colonel. All men were dressed in ordinary navy uniforms. Large repairs were not possible at Varna. It was possible to dock although there were plans to purchase a 5.000 tons dock. The small quantity of vegetables bought at Varna were cheap and of good quality.

Notes
1. Coast defence ship Marten Harpertsz Tromp, often referred to as just Tromp. She was laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 2 May 1903, launched 15 June 1904, trial 17 November 1905 and commissioned 5 April 1906. The armament consisted of 2-24cm guns, 4-15cm guns, 8-7.5cm guns, 4-3.7cm guns, one submerged torpedo tube and two submerged torpedo guns. After some voyages for instance again towards the Dutch East Indies was she decommissioned 2 May 1927, stricken 1932 and leaving 6 December 1933 Den Helder towards Pernis to be broken up. Part of her armour was used to strengthen in 1933 the fortress Kijk Uit at Den Helder, Netherlands.
2. Probably the torpedo boats Drski, Khrabry, Smely and Strogi, all launched in 1907.
3. The Kingdom of Bulgaria chose in the First World War the side of the Central Powers by declaring the war on Serbia on 14 October 1915. The Armistice of Thessalonica dated 30 September 1918 ended the war and formally by the Treaty of Neuilly-sur-Seine (1919). One of the obligations under this treaty was to decrease her army. The fact that Bulgaria entered the war was of the disastrous Balkan Wars 1912-1913 in which the Great Powers did not support Bulgaria and left her at all sides surrounded by hostile countries like Greece.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1926-1927. 

Chinese cruisers Hai Chi and Hai Yung visiting Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 16 April 1909

Dutch protected cruiser design 1894 based on the British HMS Apollo

British protected cruiser HMS Apollo of 1889

An item reported the arrival of the Chinese warships Hai Yong (1) commanding officer P.Y. Li, a crew numbering 330 men (including 30 officers) and armed with 22 guns and the Hai Chi (2), commanding officer S.K. Ahen, a crew numbering 450 men (including 50 officers) and armed with 12 guns, both coming from Hong Kong and Singapore and bound for Semarang. The Bataviaasch Dagblad of the same date confirmed this item. The edition dated 21st reported their departure.

Notes
1. According to the Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1908-1909 calling her Hai Jing visited she Tandjong-Priok 15-20 April, Semarang 21-28 April, Surabaya 29 April-7 May and Medan 21-23 May 1909. Also called Hai Yung and Hairong, protected cruiser, launched at Vulcan, Stettin, Germany in 1897, completed in 1898 and scuttled in 1937. Displacement 2.680 tons, crew numbered 244 men and with an armament of 3-15cm/5.9” L/40 Krupp quick firing guns, 8-10,5cm/4.1” L/40 Krupp quick firing guns, 6-3,7cm Hotchkiss machineguns and 3-35cm/14” torpedo tubes. Based on the Dutch Gelderland-class protected cruisers?
2. According to the Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1908-1909 visited she Tandjong-Priok 15-20 April, Semarang 21-28 April, Surabaya 29 April-6 May, Boeleleng 6 May, Ampenan 12 May and Pontianak 15-17 May 1909. Protected cruiser, laid down by Armstrong Whitworth, Low Walker, England on 11 November 1896, launched on 24 January 1898, completed on 10 May 1899 and scuttled to blockaded the Yangtze River against the Japanese naval forces on 12 August 1937. Displacement 4.300 tons. Armed with 2-20,3cm/8” guns, 10-12cm cal 45 guns and 12-4,7mm Hotchkiss guns, 42-3,7mm Hotchkiss guns, 6-11mm Maxim machinegun and 5-45,7cm torpedo tubes. Crew numbered 350-420 men. 

Crew of Dutch coastal defence ship Hr. Ms. Piet Hein behaved very well during Norwegian visit in 1909

An item reported that the Dutch coastal defence ship Hr. Ms. Piet Hein departed on 16th July 1909 Nieuwediep, Netherlands for a training voyage, arriving on the 23rd at Bergen, Norway.  The Hr. Ms. Piet Hein left Bergen on the 28th Bergen and anchored on the 30th off Skjolden and in the 31st in the entrance of the Esefjord. On 10th August she anchored in the roads of Texel, Netherlands.

The crew of the Dutch Hr. Ms. Piet Hein behaved very well reported the commanding officer. Night permission was not given, but all visited placed including Bergen were also not suited for that purpose. The chief of police of Bergen stated that the attitude of the crew was very good causing none complaints. The Dutch sailors were an example for the crews of warships of other countries.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1908-1909. 

Note
1. Part of the Evertsen-class. Laid down at the shipyard of the Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij, Rotterdam in 1893, launched on 16 August 1894, commissioned on 3 January 1896, condemned in 1914, intended sale on 18 August 1914 postponed until Tuesday 20th October at 11.30 o’clock and then sold for ƒ 90.000 to Wilton’s Scheepswerf, Rotterdam, Netherland. 

Spanish transport Legazpi visited Curacao, Dutch East Indies in April 1896 according to Dutch naval report

In the period 1895-1896 was the Dutch screw steamship 4th class Hr. Ms. Sommelsdijk stationed in the Dutch West Indies visiting the several islands belonging to this colony cruised she in the Caribbean. On 16 April 1896 she left Curacao for a training cruise returning on the 25th. In her absence visited the Spanish transport Legazpi commanded by lieutenant 1st class D. Ramon Estrada underway from Havana, Cuba towards Cayenne, French Guiana.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1895-1896. 

Italian tug (ex-Wolf 2006-2007, BB Ocean 2007-2015) Multratug 14 2015-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Terneuzen, Netherlands, IMO 9360594, MMSI 244850959 and call sign PBIJ. Gross tonnage 407 tons, net tonnage 149 tons and dimensions 31,59 (between perpendiculars)-34,50 (over all) x 11,60 (over all) x 6,50 (maximum) metres. Speed 13,9 knots. Bollard pull 75 tons. As the BB Ocean, Denmark International Register-flagged, homeport Copenhagen, MMSI 220535000 and owned and managed by Bukser&Bjerging, Oslo, Norway. Built by Astilleros Armon, Navia, Spain in 2006. Ex-Wolf of Ocean S.r.l, Trieste, Italy renamed June 2007 BB Ocean of Bjergning Danmark A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark chartered from Oceam S.r.l. and renamed Multatug 14 on 9 June 2015 chartered by Multarship B.V., Terneuzen from Ocean s.r.l. 

Dutch inland work craft Orca

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Netherlands-flagged, EU 02328529. Dimensions 24,50 x 6 x 5,60 (height) x 1,10-1,52 (maximum) x 1,80 (hold) metres. Owned by Van der Straten Aannemingsmaatschappij B.V., Hansweert, Netherlands. 

Faroe Islands-flagged general cargo ship (ex-Fortunia 1996, Sea Rover 1996-1999, Mercosul Brasil 1999-2000, Fortunia 2000-2017) Kubilai Khan 2017-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

As the Kubilai Khan, Faroe Islands-flagged, IMO 8913722, MMSI 231806000 and call sign OZ2166. Built at the Northern Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland in 1996. As the Fortunia, Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, MMSI 304010638, call sign V2OG3 and owned and managed by BBC Burger Bereederung, Burg Dithmarschen, Germany. Ex-Fortunia renamed 12 September 1996, Sea Rover renamed 15 June 1999, Mercosul Brasil renamed Fortunia on 21 March 2000. On 10 January registered as Kubilai Khan in the Faroe Islands International Ship Register. 

Dutch inland tug VLB 2 2004-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Vlissingen ENI 02325238, MMSI 244650885 and call sign PD2197. Dimensions 12,75 x 4,10 x 2,00 x 3,90 (air draft) metres. Speed 17,5 kilometres. Built by Schlieker&Zoon/Vink Diesel, Netherlands in 2004. Bollard pull 5,2 tons. Owned and managed by Vlissingse Bootliedenwacht B.V., Oost-Souburg, Netherlands. 

Belgian inland cargo ship (ex-Njord 1993-1997, Peter 1997-2007) Cetus 2007-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Belgium-flagged, EU 2321237, ENI 06004304, MMSI 205388990 and call sign OT3889. Ex-Njord renamed 1997 and Peter renamed in 1997. As Njord and Peter Netherlands owned. Built by Santerul Naval Ottenita, Otenita, Romania and completed by Bayens, Raamsdonkerveer, Netherlands in 1993. 

Dutch water tanker (ex-Waterboot 3 1953-1979, Delta Service 1979-1998, Multra Service 1998-2007) Vebo Aqua 2007-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

ENI 02308626. Owned since 2007 by VeBo Nautical Service, subsidiary of Multraship BV. With a tonnage of 290 tons with as dimensions 29,86 x 7,06 x 2,39 metres and horsepower of 198 ihp. Built in 1953 at the shipyard Sleephelling Mij. Scheveningen in Schevingen, Netherlands as Waterboot 3 for Neptunus Waterboot NV, Rotterdam, since 1979 of the Delta Service for Delta Investment BV, Oost Souburg, since 1998 Multra Service for Multraship BV in Terneuzen and since 2007 the Vebo Aqua. 

French containership CMA CGM Sambhar 2006-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9295969, MMSI 210481000 and call sign 5BND2. Owned and managed by CMA CGM, Marseille, France. Built by CSBC, Kaohsiung, Taiwan in2006. 

Dutch floating drydock

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Of Damen Shiprepair Vlissingen. Former Swedish drydock. 

Spanish galley San Miguel y Santa Barbara 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples. captain Mosén Juan Pujades.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349. 

Spanish galley San Jorge y San Jaime 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples. captain Mosén Francisco Zapila,

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349. 

Spanish galley San Onofre y Santa Magdalena 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples. captain Mosén Francisco Zapila.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349. 

Spanish galley San Christóbal y San Augustin 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples. captain Francisco Sasierra.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349. 

Spanish galley Santa Maria del Rosario y Santa Elisabet 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples. captain Mosén Miguel Sasierra.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349

Spanish galley Sa Francisco y Santa Elena 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349. 

Spanish galley San Pedro y San Jerónimo 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349. 

Spanish galley San Severo y Santa Eulalia 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349. 

Galera real 1506

Part of the Spanish naval squadron which escorted D. Fernando in 1506 to Naples.

Source
C. Fernandez Duro. Armada española desde la unión de los reinos de Catilla y de Leon. Vol 1, 1895, p. 348-349. 

Dutch inland cargo ship (ex-Corma 1960-1987, Eemsman 1987) Bar-Melus 1987

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Netherlands-flagged, ENI 03110460, MMSI 244770571 and call sign PF2730. Ex-Corman renamed 1987 and Eemsman renamed 1987. Self unloading with own crane. Built by Van Goor, Monnikendam, Netherlands with yard number 601 in 1960. 

British offshore construction jack up Seajacks Scylla 2015-


Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Panama-flagged, IMO 9698939, MMSI 356068000 and call sign 3FSA3. Owned and managed by Seajacks UK, Great Yarmouth, United Kingdom. Built by Samsung Shipbuilding&Heavy Industries, Geoje, South Korea as Samsung 205 in November 2015. Fitted out with a 1.500tons leg-encircling crane. Incorporate useable deck space 5.000 square metres. More as 8.000 tons of available variable load. GustoMSC NG14000X. Hull dimensions 139 (main deck) x 50 x 11 (hull depth) x 6 (draft to hull) metres. Main crane mount wrap-around the starboard aft leg boom length 104 metres. 

Norwegian general cargo ship (ex-Northern Langnes 1996-2002) Wilson Leer 2002-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9150482, MMSI 249720000 and call sign 9HEB5. Ex-Northern Langnes renamed May 2002. Owned and managed by Wilson Eurocarriers, Bergen, Norway. Built by Slovenske Lodenice, Komarno, Slovakia in 1996. 

Dutch oil/chemical tanker Stolt Cormorant 1999-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Cayman Islands, homeport George Town, IMO 9148960, MMSI 319301000 and call sign ZCSE5. Owned and managed by Stolt Tankers, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Built by Inma, La Spezia, Italy in 1999. 

Belgian tug St. Annastrand 1991-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

IMO 8915471, MMSI 205057000 and call sign ORKG. Built by Scheepswerf Van Rupelmonde NV, Rupelmonde, Belgium with yard number 465 in 1991. Made of steel. Speed 13,2 knots. Gross tonnage 249 tons, net tonnage 74 tons, deadweight 134 tons and as dimensions 27,35 (between perpendiculars-30,00 (registered)-30,62 (over all) x 8,70 (registered)-8.80 (over all) x 4,60 (maximum) x 4,64 (depth) metres. Freeboard 0,511 metres. Seagoing azimuth stern drive. Bollard pull 39 (ahead)-37 (astern) tons, Owned by Unite van Redding- en Sleepdienst. Antwerp, Belgium. 

Japanese bulk carrier Coral Opal 2012-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Panama-flagged, IMO 9591973, MMSI 373495000 and call sign 3FDY4. Owned and managed by TEMM Maritime. Kobe, Japan. Built by Shin Kurushima Toyohashi Shipbuilding, Toyohashi, Japan in 2012. 

Ovet floating crane Noordzeereus IV 1996-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 7 July 2007

Owned and managed by Ovet, Terneuzen, Netherlands. Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9136187, MMSI 244439000 and call sign PGDG. Gross tonnage 819 tons, deadweight 45,44 x 21,04 metres and built by Ravestein Shipyard&Construction, Deest, Netherlands in 1996. 

Kuwait container ship Al Dhail 2016-

Schelde off Netherlands 7 July 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9732307, MMSI 538005843 and call sign V7HL8. Built in 2016. Owned and managed by UASC, Safat, Kuwait. Built by Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries, Samho, South Korea in 2016. 

Sunday, 23 July 2017

British battleship HMS Colossus executing trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 4

HMS Neptune

Colossus-clss

Orion-class

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the British battleship HMS Colossus (1), the second battleship built under the budget 1909. achieved at her full power trials a speed of 22,6 miles and the distance between Plymouth, England and Portsmouth, England. At her 8-hours trials was with a horsepower pf 29.000 hp a speed achieved of 21,5 miles. The Colossus and the Hercules were fitted out with a complete standardized machinery make it possible to exchange all parts if needed. Even if two turbines were stopped was still a speed of 17 miles with the remaining two turbines possible. Completed within 21-22 months.(1)

Note
1. Part of the Colossus-class consisting of the Colossus and the Hercules, preceded by the Neptune-class and succeeded by the Orion-class. Building ordered under the 1908 Naval Estimates. Laid down at the Scotts Shipbuilding, Greenock, Scotland on 8 July 1909, launched in 9 April 1910, trials started on 28 February 1911, commissioned on 8 August 1911, stricken in 1920, for disposal on 30 June 1921, boys’ training ship, training hulk since 23 July 1923, sold to the Charlestown Shipbreaking Industries in August 1928 and broken up at Charlestown, Scotland from 5 September 1928. 

British battle cruiser HMS Indefatigable fastest armoured ship in the world according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 4

Australian battle cruiser HMAS Australia

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the British battle cruiser HMS Indefatigable achieved on her way back to Plymouth, England a speed of 29 miles, which was the highest speed achieved ever by an armoured ship. The 30 hours trial for testing the manoeuvrability was a success.(1)

Note
1. Of the Indefatigable-class battle cruisers consisting of the Indefatigable, Australia and the New Zealand, preceded by the Invincible-class and succeeded by the Lion-class. Building ordered under the 1908-1909 Naval Programme, laid down at the Devonport Dockyard on 23 February 1909, launched on 28 October 1909, commissioned on 24 February 1911 and sunk during the Battle of Jutland against the German Imperial Navy on 31 May 1916. 

Turbines on board of British cruisers demanding extremely much space according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 4

An item referred to the German magazine Schiffbau reporting that the British cruiser Amphion (1) of the building was to start on short notice at Pembroke, England was to be fitted out with a combination of Parsons and Curtis turbines and just 2 propeller shafts to reduced the necessary needed space. A second item claimed that on board of her and of the 4 former Boadicea’s (2) the machinery over a length of 74 feet demanded the complete width of the ship. Estimated was when for the Boadicea’s was chosen for piston engines, just half of the space was required now used for the turbines.

Notes
1. Part of the Active class scout cruisers consisting of the Active, Amphion and Fearless, preceded by the Blonde-class, laid down at Pembroke Navy Yard on 27 July 1910, launched on 14 March 1911, commissioned in December 1911 and sold to be broken up on 21 May 1920. In fact fitted out with 2 Parsons steam turbine sets and  shafts.
2. The Boadicea-class scout cruisers consisting of the Boadicea and Bellona, preceded by the Sentinel-class and succeeded by the Blonde-class, were fitted out with 4 shafts and 2 Parsons steam turbine sets. The Blonde-class consisting of the Blonde and Blanche, succeeded by the Active class were also fitted out with 4 shafts and 2 Parsons steam turbine sets. 

Torpedo’s of the barrage for Cherbourg, France exploded according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item reported that several torpedoes of the barrage [=seamines] in the western waterway towards Cherbourg, France on 30 May during a heavy thunderstorm exploded in the roads. In the past happened the same at Cherbourg, Rochefort, Toulon and near Cape Saint-Jacques off Saigon. The assumption was that the lightning created induced currents which ignited the glowing circuits in the torpedoes. 

Study program of midshipmen in Royal Netherlands Navy changed according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item reported that within the Royal Netherlands Navy the midshipmen no longer were obliged to study Malay but more military law. 

French torpedo boat No. 72 heavily damaged in collision with tug according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the French torpedo boat No. 72 was heavily damaged in a collision with a tug off Cherbourg, France. Several hull plates were pressed inside and in the boiler room killed one men and 3 men badly burned. The torpedo boat was towed towards Cherbourg but probably no longer to be used for war purposes. 

Seizure of American warships by creditors not acceptable according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item reported that the US cabinet decided that a seizure of a American warship by creditors was not acceptable. Creditors of the United States Shipbuilding Company seized the nearly completed cruiser Chattanooga.(1)

Note
1. The Chattanooga (C-16), part of the Denver-class protected cruisers, laid down by the Cresecent Shipyard, Elizabethport, New Jersey, USA on 29 March 1900, launched on 7 March 1903, commissioned on 11 October 1904 and finally sold to be broken up on 8 March 1930. She was completed at the New York Navy Yard. 

British battleship HMS Hercules executing trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 4

HMS Neptune

Colossus-clss

Orion-class

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the British battleship HMS Hercules (1) achieved a horsepower of 28.700 hp with 335 rpm. At her 30 hours trial with 7/10 of the full power was a speed of 19,6 miles achieved with 18.000 hp at 296 rpm. Fitted out with the latest Yarrow boilers and which performed excellent. The Colossus and the Hercules were fitted with a complete standardized machinery make it possible to exchange all parts if needed. Even if two turbines were stopped was a speed with the remaining two turbines of still 17 miles possible. Completed within 21-22 months.

Note
1. Part of the Colossus-class consisting of the Colossus and the Hercules, preceded by the Neptune-class and succeeded by the Orion-class. Laid down at Palmers, Jarrow, England on 30 July 1909, launched on 10 May 1910, commissioned on 31 July 1911, part of the reserve since February 1919, sold to a German shipbreaker on 8 November 1921 and broken up at Kiel, Germany in 1922. 

Dutch crane ship Svanen 1990-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 21 July 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9007453, MMSI 308851000 and call sign C6LA2. Built by Grootint at Zwijndrecht, Netherlands[De Groot‘s Staalconstructies v.o.f., since 1990 part of the Heerema Fabrication Group], Netherlands in 1990-1991. Gross tonnage 14.035 tons, net tonnage 4.082 tons, deadweight 7.871 tons, displacement 20.562 tons and as dimensions 102 (between perpendiculars)-102,8 (over all) x 24,4 (floats) x 71,8 x 4,5 (summer)-6.0 metres. Height 102 metres. Owned by Ballast Nedam Equipment, Nieuwegein, Netherlands until November 2015 when Van Oord bought the offshore division including the Svanen. Lifting capacity 8.700 tons. Height crane above work platform 76,0 metres. Speed 7 knots with no wind. In fact consisting of two connected floats and a gigantic crane. Self propelling. Designed by Gusto Engineeering. 

Dutch tug (ex-Thomas Letzer 1993-2000, Evergem 2000-2015, Samsun Tug 2015) Multratug 1 2015-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 21 July 2017

As the Evergem Belgium-flagged, homeport Antwerp, IMO 9035008, MMSI 205082000 and call sign ORLH. Tonnage 249 gross and 74 net tons and as dimensions 27,28 (between perpendiculars)-31,99 (over all) x 8,70 (over all) x 4,65 (maximum) metres. The horsepower of 2.000 kW allowed a speed 13,5 knots. Bollard pull 39 (ahead) tons, Built in 1993 at the NV Scheepswerf van Rupelmonde, Rupelmonde, Belgium. Owned and managed by the URS-Unie van Redding en Sleepdienst NV of Antwerp, Belgium. Renamed on 25 January 2000 Evergem. Sold in spring 2015 and at Ridderkerk, Netherlands temporarily renamed Samsun Tug with as homeport Freetown, Sierra Leone. Sold in August 2015 to Maultraship Towage&Salvage, Terneuzen, Netherlands  and renamed Multratug 1 in, Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9035008, MMSI 244870324 and call sign PDCM. 

Norwegian (ex-Bogazici 7 2010, Waterchief 2010-2011, B.B. Hunter 2011-2013) Multratug 20 2013-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 21 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Terneuzen, Netherlands. IMO 9572006, MMSI 244790899 and call sign PBFX. Ex-Bogazici 7, renamed B.B. Hunter of Taubaat Service A/S. Kristiansund Norway in July 2010, renamed B.B. Hunter of Bkser of Bergning A/S, Olso, Norway in June  2011 and on 11 June 2013 renamed Multratug 20 while chartered from Taubautservice A/S, by Multraship B.V., Terneuzen. Built by Bogazici Shipping, Bogazici, Turkey with yard number NB06-12. Type 65+ Bogazici Escort. Dimensions 30,26 (between perpendiculars)-32,50 (over all) x 11,70 x 5,60 x 4,30 metres, gross register tonnage 463 tons and net tonnage 139 tons. Bollard pull 72 tons and speed 13 knots. 

Italian LPG tanker (ex-Taygete Star 2007-2011) Matthew 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 July 2017

Madeira-flagged, IMO 9356921, MMSI 255802940 and call sign CQOT. Ex-Taygete Star renamed May 2011. Owned and managed by Lumaship, Naples, Italy. Built by Madenci Marine Industry, Karadeniz Eregli, Turkey in 2007. 

Dutch LPG tanker Bayamo 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands, IMO 9655004, MMSI 245669000 and call sign PCMA. Owned and managed by Chemgas Shipping, Rotterdam. Built by Shipyard Construction Hoogezand, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2013. 

Dutch general cargo ship Arklow Vanguard 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9772577, MMSI 244050844 and PDAY. Built by Royal Bodewes Shipyard, Hoogezand with yard number 726 in 2017. Owned by Avoca Shipping B.V., and managed by Arklow Shipping Nederlands B.V., both at Rotterdam, Netherlands. 

Qatar oil/chemical tanker Dukhan 2003-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 July 2017

Qatar-flagged, homeport Doha, IMO 9251286, MMSI 466217000 and call sign A7LL. Owned and managed by Qatar Shipping, Doha, Qatar. Built by Shinasb Yard, Tongyoung, South Korea in 2003. 

Kenyan patrol boat KNS Shujaa (P3130) 1997-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 21 July 2017

Of the Shujaa-class consisting of the Shujaa and Shupavu, built at the Construnaves-CNE, Gondan, Spain 1996-1997 using a civil design and commissioned within the Kenyan navy in 1998. Fitted out in Kenya with an armament consisting of 1-7,6cm 62 cal Oto-Breda super rapid gun and 1-20cm 90cal Oerlikon anti aircraft gun. Arrived on 1 December 2016 on board of the German general cargo ship Amoenitas in Vlissingen, Netherlands to be refitted by Damen Shiprepair including a new bridge. As a research and survey vessel IMO 9133123. Gross tonnage 66 tons, summer deadweight 144 tons, displacement 480 tons (full load) and as dimensions 58,0 x 8,2 x 2,8 metres. Speed 2 knots. Ordered in March 1997 to be used for offshore patrol duties. Crew numbers 24 men. 

Dutch coast guard vessel Zeearend 2002-

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 22 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9226853, MMSI 245888000 and call sign PBDP. Built at Damen Shipyard Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands in 2002. 

Dutch floating drydock

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 21 July 2017

Of Damen Shiprepair Vlissingen. 

Dutch floating drydock

Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 21 July 2017

Of Damen Shiprepair Vlissingen. Former Swedish drydock. 

Saturday, 22 July 2017

Danish warship David 1564

First mentioned and captured by the Swedish in 1564, with an armament of 42 guns.

Source
R.C. Anderson. Naval Wars in the Baltic during the sailing epoch 1522-1850. London, 1910. 

Danish warship Bjorn 1570

First mentioned and captured by the Swedish in 1570.

Source
R.C. Anderson. Naval Wars in the Baltic during the sailing epoch 1522-1850. London, 1910. 

Danish warship Bjorn 1565

First mentioned and burnt to prevent capture In 1565.

Source
R.C. Anderson. Naval Wars in the Baltic during the sailing epoch 1522-1850. London, 1910. 

Danish warship Arcke 1565

First mentioned and burnt to prevent capture in 1565.

Source
R.C. Anderson. Naval Wars in the Baltic during the sailing epoch 1522-1850. London, 1910. 

Danish war ship Merkurius 1566

Wrecked in 1566.

Source
R.C. Anderson. Naval Wars in the Baltic during the sailing epoch 1522-1850. London, 1910. 

German general cargo ship (ex-Hohe Plate 2005) Andante 2005-

Locks Kieler Canal, July 2017

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9341108, MMSI 236111321 and call sign ZDGU3. Ex-Hohe Plate renamed June 2005. Owned and managed by Briese Schiffahrt, Leer, Germany. Built by Xingang Shipbuilding, Heavy Industry, Tianjin, China in 2005. 

Dutch general cargo ship (ex-JRS Aquarius 2009) IJjsseldijk 2009-

Locks Kieler Canal, July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Groningen, IMO 9514913, MMSI 246626000 and call sign PBUY. Ex-Aquarius renamed November 2009. Built by Chowgule, Goa, India in 2009. Owned and managed by Navigia Shipmanagement, Groningen, Netherlands. 

Dutch general cargo ship Andrea 2006-

Kieler Canal, July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Spijk, IMO 9350939, MMSI 246140000 and call sign PHGZ. Built by Lodenice Chvaletice, Chvaletice, Czech Republic in 2006. Owned and managed by Van Dam Scheepvaart. Spijk, Netherlands. 

French battleship Danton executed with success her trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 4




An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the French battleship Danton fitted out with a machinery consisting of turbines and Belleville-boilers executed her full power trial with success. The estimated speed and coal consumption were respectively 18,25 miles and 18.720 kilo, in reality 19,44 miles and 18.265 kilo. Four days later was a 3 hours trial executed with as result a speed of 20,18 miles and 1.162 kilo coals/mile, which was more as was expected. Rpm 316,7. Coals consumption hour.169kilo/square metre grid surface. The end conclusion was that a combination turbines and Belleville boilers could be very successful.(1)

Note
1. Of the Danton-class consisting of the Condorcet, Danton, Diderot, Mirabeau, Vergniaud and Voltaire. Laid down at the Arsenal de Brest, Brest, France on 9 January 1908, launching in May 1909 blocked by French socialists, launched on 4 July 1909, commissioned on 24 July 1911 and sunk by the German submarine U-64 22 miles south west of Sardinia, Italy at 13.17 o’clock on 19 March 1917. The wreck was found back on the position 38°45’35” North and 8°3’30” East. Preceded by the Liberté-class and succeeded by the Courbet-class. Due to the huge number of changes of the original design and lacking decisions of the French minister of navy Gaston Thomson (29 January 1848, Oran, French Algeria-14 May 1932 Bône, Algeria) in time caused a serious delay in realizing the class

French battleship Diderot executed with success trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 4

Danton-class

Danton


An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the French battleship Diderot with a machinery of turbines and Niclausse-boilers with success executed her trials. At the full power trial was instead of the contracted speed of 19,25 miles a speed if 19,90 miles achieved and with even runs of 20,14 miles. Coal consumption 170 kilo/square metre grid surface/hour.(1)

Note
1. Of the Danton-class consisting of the Condorcet, Danton, Diderot, Mirabeau, Vergniaud and Voltaire. Building at the Ateliers et Chantiers de la Loire, St. Nazaire, France started in 26 December 1906, laid down on 23 August 1907, launched on 19 April 1909, completed on 1 August 1911, modernized 1922-1925, training ship since 1927, condemned on 17 March 1937 and sold for 3.557.019 French francs to M. Gosselin-Durlez, arriving at Dunkirk, France to be broken up on 31 August 1937. Preceded by the Liberté-class and succeeded by the Courbet-class. Due to the huge number of changes of the original design and lacking decisions of the French minister of navy Gaston Thomson (29 January 1848, Oran, French Algeria-14 May 1932 Bône, Algeria) in time caused a serious delay in realizing the class. General technical specifications of this class. 

French cabinet chose for Courbet-class dreadnought for machinery similar to the Danton-class according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 4

Courbet-class



Danton-class

An item referred to the German magazine Schiffbau reported that the French minister of navy (1) stated in the French parliament that within the cabinet heavily was discussed about the turbine issue for the new 18.000 tons battleships.(2) At last was decided to choose for the type of the Condorcet (3) and Voltaire.(4)

Notes
1. Or Augustus Manuel Hubert Gaston Boué de Lapeyrère (18 January 1852 Castéra-Lectourois, France-17 February 1924 Pau, France), admiral, minister between 24 July 1909-2 March 1911 or Théophile Delcassé (1 March 1852 Pamiers, France-22 February 1923 Nice, France), minister between 2 March 1911-21 January 1913.
4. The Courbet-class consisting of the Courbet, France, Jean Bart and Paris, preceded by the Danton-class and succeeded by the Bretagne-class, built between 1910-1914, with a displacement of 23.475 (standard-(25.579 (full load) tons. Machinery consisted of 4-shaft Parsons direct-drive steam turbines and 24 boilers delivering 28.000ihp.
3. Laid down by Ateliers et Chantiers de la Loire, Saint-Nazaire, France on 23 August 1907, launched on 20 April 1910, commissioned on 25 July 1911 and broken up which was completed around 1949. Machinery consisted of 4 Parsons steam direct-drive turbines and 26 Niclausse boilers delivering 22.500shp. Of the Danton-class.
4. Laid down by FC de la Méditerranée, La Seyne-sur-Mer, France on 20 July 1907, launched on 16 January 1909, completed on 1 August 1911 and sold to be broken up in December 1949. Machinery consisted of 4 Parsons steam direct-drive turbines and 26 Belleville boilers delivering 22.500shp. Of the Danton-class. 

German general cargo ship Christine 1998-


Rendsburg, Germany, July 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9184811, MMSI 304010973 and call sign V2PX5. Built by Damen Shipyard Galati, Galati, Romania in 1998. Owned by Lohmann Bereederungen, Haren Ems, Germany and managed by Transship, Emmen, Netherlands.