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Thursday, 22 June 2017

American Electric Boat Company submarine design Type 8 dated 23 March 1905

An improved type 7P –design. With a length of 80 feet and as displacement 135 (light)-165 (submerged) tons.

Design average achievements of the design on official trials.
In the so-called light condition was the maximum speed 9,5 knots, endurance 60 hours and the range 570 nautical miles. With the cruising speed of 7 knots was the endurance 120 hours and the range 840 nautical miles.
In the so-called intermediate condition was the maximum speed 8,5 knots, endurance 60 hours and the range 510 nautical miles. Cruising speed comparable with light condition.
In the so-called submerged condition carrying the periscope was the speed 7,5 knots, the endurance 3,5 hours and the range 26 nautical miles, at 6 knots respectively 9 hours and 54 nautical miles and with 4,5 knots 30 hours respectively 135 nautical miles/

Armament consisted of 2 torpedo tubes and she carried 4 torpedoes with her. The torpedoes were loaded in the submarine already assembled although still always accessible for maintenance or adjustment. Reloading while submerged and using al  4 torpedoes was to be realized within 4-5 minutes.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T 214.802.

American Electric Boat Company submarine design Type 9 dated 23 March 1905

The type 9 was similar to the type 16 type sharing the same improvements of the type 7-P type. Length 105 feet and a displacement of 227 (light)-265 (submerged) tons.

Average achievements of the design on official trials. The guaranteed achievements were somehow slightly lower. For surface purposes fitted out with a gasoline engine.
In the so-called light condition was the maximum speed 11 knots, endurance 60 hours and the range 660 nautical miles. With the cruising speed of 8,5 knots was the endurance 120 hours and the range 1.020 nautical miles.
In the so-called intermediate condition was the maximum speed 10 knots, endurance 60 hours and the range 600 nautical miles. With the cruising speed of 8 knots was the endurance 120 hours and the range 960 nautical miles.
In the so-called submerged condition carrying a periscope was the maximum sustained sped 8 knots, the endurance 4 hours and the range 32 nautical miles, at 7 knots an endurance of 9 hours and a range of 63 nautical miles and with a speed of 5 knots respectively 30 hours and 150 nautical miles.

In contrary to the 8 was the type 9 fitted out with twin screws and was the auxiliary machinery doubled.

The armament was similar to the Type 16 designs although the number of torpedoes she could carry with her was increased to another two. Strangely enough the E.B.C. did not recommended to do this.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T 214.802.

American Electric Boat Company submarine design Type 7-P dated 23 March 1905


The Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. O 1 built using this design
 

The submarine was called an improved submarine torpedo boat identical with the Adler and Plunger submarines which were built for the US Navy. This design included all modifications used in the Fulton and the ones not applied while the Fulton was already completed. Displacement 104 (light)-123 (submerged) tons with a length. The steel made hull was designed for a diving depth of 300 feet. In practice was actually dived to a depth of 160 feet without deformation. For safety reasons was no cast iron used for parts subjected to pressure while she was submerged.

Fitted out with a 4 single acting cylinders gasoline inverted Marine type with an electric spark ignition. Fired by ordinary gasoline stored in a tank located forward away from all sources of heat. The company claimed that the fuel tank and the pipelines connected with the engine were such tight that leaking was impossible. The electric motor was a waterproof Marine type.

Average achievements of the design on official trials. The guaranteed achievements were somehow slightly lower.
In the so-called light condition was the maximum speed 8,5 knots, endurance 35 hours and the range 300 nautical miles. With the economical speed of 6,5 knots was the endurance 70 hours and the range 450 nautical miles.
In the so-called intermediate condition was the maximum speed 7,5 knots, endurance 25 hours and the range 262 nautical miles. With the economical speed of 6 knots was the endurance 70 hours and the range 420 nautical miles.
In the so-called submerged condition carrying a periscope was the maximum sustained sped 6,75 knots, the endurance 3,5 hours and the range 24 nautical miles. With the economical speed of 4,5 knots was the endurance 22 hours and the range 100 nautical miles. With the intermediate speed of 6 knots was the endurance 7 hours and the range 42 nautical miles.

Tactical diameter is 75 (submerged)-150 (surfaced) yards. Able to dive within 50 seconds.

There were 3 steering stations available, on deck, in the bronze made conning tower and the submarine herself. Just one crewmember controlled the diving station for submerging and controlling the submarine.

The armament consisted of just one submerged 45cm fixed torpedo tube in the bow for which 3-5metres long torpedoes were carried (one already in the tube).


Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T 214.802.

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Italian cargo ship (ex-Meta 1911-1954) Onice 1954-


Built from steel as a 2-mast schooner, sail area 365 square metres, 137 gross tonnage, 104 tons net tonnage, 227 tons deadweight and as dimensions 27,69 x 7,02 x 2,66 metres. Crew numbered 6 men. Owned by Partenreederei, Brake, Germany, in 1919 as war reparations handed over to France, 1920 owned by M. Valoussiere, Marseille, France, in 1921 fitted out with 1-2cylinder two stroke diesel, sold in 1923 towards Italy, renamed Onice in 1953, fitted out with 1-180hp 4 cylinder four stroke diesel, sold in 2004 to be broken up at Trapani, but intentions changed since then and she is now under reconstruction to be completed around 2018-2010. 

Italian oil/chemical tanker Turchese 2000-

Kieler Kanaal, Germany June 2017

Italy-flagged, homeport Ancona, IMO 9220354, MMSI 247604000 and call sign IBLE. Owned and managed by Finbeta, Savona, Italy. Built by Cantiere Navale Morini, Ancona, Italy in 2000. 

Finnish tug (ex-Aulis 1981-2011) Apollon 2011-

Rauma, Finland 18 June 2017

Finland-flagged, IMO 7927946, MMSI 230178000 and as call sign OIOH. Built by Hollming, Rauma, Finland in 1981. Ex-Aulis renamed January 2011. Gross tonnage 314 tons, net tonnage 95 tons, deadweight 75 tons and as dimensions 30,99 x 10,02 metres. As the Aulis owned by Neste Shipping Oy, Espoo, AB, Nynas Petroleum, Stockholm, Sweden. Converted into a pusher tug by Holming, Rauma in 1990. 

Chinese bulk carrier (ex-Peace Voyage 2010-2013) Yangze Navigation 2013-


Bremerhaven, Germany June 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9574420, MMSI 538005184 and call sign V7BP9. Ex-Peace Voyage renamed June 2013. Owned and managed by Yangzijiang Shipping, Shanghai, China. Built by Jiangsu New Yangzhijiang Shipbuilding, Jingjiang, China in 2010. 

German container ship (ex-OOCL Neva 2001-2011) Neuenfelde 2011-

Bremerhaven, Germany June 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, St. Johns, IMO 9231846, MMSI 305287000 and call sign V2DO9. Ex-OOCL Nevada renamed November 2011. Owned and managed by Bartels Reederei, Neu Wulmstorf, Germany. Built by JJ Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2001. 

Croatian bulk carrier (ex-Kali 2000-2008) Molat 2008-


Bremerhaven, Germany June 2017

Croatia-flagged, homeport Zadar, IMO 9211559, MMSI 238247000 and call sign 9AA5801. Ex-Kali renamed July 2008. Owned and managed by Tankerska Plovidba, Zadar, Croatia. Built by Tsuneishi Heavy Industries, Balamban, Philippines in 2000. 

Tuesday, 20 June 2017

British light cruiser HMS Curlew (1917) in 1923

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Ceres (1917) in 1923

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Curacoa (1917) in 1923

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1918. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Caradoc (1916) in 1923

With our thanks to Novice

Caledon type. Launched in 1916 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.120 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Calypso (1917) in 1923

Caledon type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.120 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Caledon (1916) in 1923

Caledon type. Launched in 1916 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.120 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Coventry (1917) in 1923



With our thanks to Novice

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1918. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Cardiff (1917) in 1923

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Colombo (1918) in 1923

With our thanks to Novic

Carlisle-type. Launched in 1918 and completed in 1919. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Carlisle (1918) in 1923

Carlisle-type. Launched in 1918 and completed in 1918. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Calcutta (1918) in 1923

With our thanks to Novice

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Carlisle-type. Launched in 191 and completed in 1919. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Capetown (1919) in 1923

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Carlisle-type. Launched in 1919 and completed in 1922. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Cairo (1918) in 1923

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942



Carlisle-type. Launched in 1918 and completed in 1919. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Vindictive (1918) in 1923

The HMS Vindictive (ex-Cavendish) as aircraft carrier later converted back into cruiser

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Improved Birmingham type. Launched in 1918 and completed in 1918. Displacement 9.750 tons. Horsepower 60.000 hp. Coal and oil fuelled all geared turbines machinery. Armament consisted of 4-7.5” guns, 4-3” guns, 4-3” anti aircraft guns, 1-12pd field gun, 12 machineguns and 6 torpedo tubes (2 submerged).

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Hawkins (1917) in 1923


Improved Birmingham type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1919. Displacement 9.750 tons. Horsepower 60.000 hp. Coal and oil fuelled all geared turbines machinery. Armament consisted of 7-7.5” guns, 4-3” anti aircraft guns, 1-12pd field gun, 12-2p guns and machineguns and 6 torpedo tubes (2 submerged).

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American Electric Boat Company submarine design 203-D dated 23 March 1914

On 23 March 1914 send the American Electric Boat Company (E.B.C.) specialized in building submarine her design 203-D as response on the requirements sent by the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands dated 19 February. The Dutch shipyard built submarines using designs of the E.B. C. since her first submarine the Luctor et Emergo (later Hr. Ms. O1) laid down in 1904.(1)

The 203-D was presented as a standard design which had excellent results in practice as the E.B.C. claimed. Dimensions were not supplied, the displacement is written down in a pencil note 544,1 (surfaced)-782,0 (submerged) tons.

The speed while surfaced was 11 knots with 70% horsepower against the 12 knots asked for. However with both machines full power guaranteed E.B.C. 14 knots and estimated even 14,5 knots. Wirth a speed of 11 knots was the range 3.150 (guaranteed)-3.500 (estimated) nautical miles. The speed while submerged was 8,5 knots during 3 (guaranteed)-3,25 (estimated) ours., during 1-1,5 hours 9,5 (guaranteed)-10,125 (estimated) hours and a maximum speed during one hours of 10,5 (guaranteed)-11 (designed) knots. With an economic speed of 5 knots was the estimated range 80 nautical miles. The large rudder could be turned very quickly with the available motor to make the smallest turning circle as possible.

Water ballast tankage was 88 metric tons or 18% of the submerged displacement. Reserve buoyancy while surfaced was 111 tons (included 65% of the volume of the superstructure) comparable with a displacement of 27,8% (surfaced)-23,8% (submerged). The submarine was designed for a diving depth of 61 metres/200 feet instead pf the required 40 metres. The ballast tanks used for the hull were tested with a pressure equal to a depth of 51 metres. The two main bilge pumps aft had at each a capacity of 1.288 litres/minute, the auxiliary pump placed amidships had a capacity of 227 litres/minute. So it was possible to free the tanks from water at the surface within 30 minutes. If necessary were the pumps capable to blow the main tanks empty within 45 minutes when the submarine was on a depth of 200 feet.

Personnel accommodation available for 2 officers and 14 sailors and petty officers. To make it livable when operating in tropical areas were the living quarters inside sheated with cork to eliminate the sun heat. Strangely was in this design no provision made for a refrigerator, which was an absolute must for the Royal Netherlands Navy with submarines serving in the Dutch East Indies.

The armament was to consist of 4 internal bow torpedo tubes for which 8 torpedoes were available.

Against additional costs was a wireless telegraph to be installed.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive of Vlissingen) inv.no. 214.802

Note
1. On 24 July 1914 was the submarine Hr. Ms. K III ordered for account of the Department of Colonies and which was to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Probably the asked E.B.C. design was a preliminary design for this submarine regarded her displacement. The Dutch K-series submarines were for service in the Dutch East Indies and the so-called much smaller O-series for service in the European coastal waters. In the 1930s was that difference diminished.

Monday, 19 June 2017

Singapore oil/chemical tanker (ex-Alga 2012-2015) Maersk Adriatic 2015-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9636632, MMSI 566429000 and call sign 9V3388. Owned by Maersk Tankers Singapore Pte. Ltd. and operated by Maersk tankers A/S. According to maritime connector and shipspotting the Alga, Marshall Islands-flagged, MMSI 538004769, call sign V7YZ3. owned and managed by Socatra, Bordeaux, France. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2012. According to forums.Clyde maritime renamed Alga 14 April 2015, but was Socatra Ltd. based at Monaco. 

Chinese general cargo ship Tian Jian 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

China-flagged, IMO 9722754, MMSI 413489920 and call sign BOAR. Built by Huangpu Shipbuilding, Guangzhou, China as Guangzhou Huangpu in 2016. Owned and managed by Coscol, Guangzhou, China. 

Dutch law enforce patrol vessel RWS 78 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9479137, MMSI 246586000 and call sign PBSM. Built by De Haas Scheepsbouwwerf, Maass;uis, Netherlands in 2011. 

French submarine Redoutable and Vengeur launched according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1928 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that in spring 1928 the French submarines Redoubtable (1) and Vengeur (2) were launched. Displacement 1.560 (surfaced)-2.080 (submerged) tons, speed 18,5 (surfaced)-10 (submerged) miles, power of diesel engines 2x3.000 ahp. With a speed of 9 miles was the range 8.000 miles. Armament consisted of 1-10cm gun and 10-55cm torpedo tubes.

Notes
1. Of the Redoutable-class, Type 1 project consisting of the Redoutable and the Vengeur. Q136. Building ordered in 1924, launched on 24 February 1928, commissioned on 10 July 1931, scuttled at Toulon, France on 27 September 1942, refloated but sunk during a bombardment on 11 March 1944.
2. Of the Redoutable-class, Type 1 project consisting of the Redoutable and the Vengeur. Q137. Building ordered in 1924, launched on 1 September 1928, commissioned on 18 December 1931 and scuttled at Toulon, France on 27 November 1942. 

French navy believed in superiority of her Duguay Trouin-class cruisers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1926 no. 4

French Duguay-Trouin class


American Omaha-class

British Hawkins-class

Spanish Almirante Cercera-class


Dutch cruiser Hr. Ms. Java

An item referred to the Naval and Military Record dated 31 March 1926 reporting that within the French navy was believed that the French Duguay Trouin cruisers (1) were superior to the American Omaha-class (2) while they were faster despite the fact that the Omaha’s could fire fore and afterwards with 6 against the French just 4 guns. Further more were the French cruisers superior qua armament and/or speed against the British 7.900 ton Hawkins (3) and Enterprise (4), the Spanish 7.900 ton Alfonso’s (5) and the Dutch Sumatra’s.(6)

Notes
1. Duguay Trouin class light cruisers, succeeded by the Jeanne d’Arc. Consisting of 3 ships, displacement 7.365 (standard)-9.500 (full load) tons, speed 30 knots, armour consisting of a 2cm/0.79 thick deck, 3cm/1.2” thick magazine box and the gun turrets and conning tower protected by 3cm/1.2”. Armament consisted of 4x2-15,5cm/6.1” cal 50 guns, 4x1-7,5cm/3” anti aircraft guns and 4x3-55cm/22” torpedo tubes.
2. Omaha-class light cruisers, preceded by the Chester-class, succeeded by the Brooklyn-class, displacement 7.160 tons, speed 35 knots and an armament of 7x1&2x2-15,2cm/6” 53 cal guns, 4-7,6cm/3” 50 cal guns and 2x3-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes. The armour consisted of a 7,6cm/3” thick belt and a 3,8cm/1.5” thick deck. Consisted of 10 ships.
3. Hawkins-class heavy cruisers of 5 were built, succeeded by the County-class, built between 1916-1925, displacement 9.750 (standard)-12.190 (full load) tons, speed 31 knots, armour main belt maximum 7,6cm/3, upper belt maxim 5,1cm/2”, upper deck maximum 3,8cm/1.5”, main deck maximum 3,8cm/1.5”and gun shields maximum 5,1cm/2”.
4. Emerald class light cruiser, built 1918-1926, displacement 7.700 tons, speed 33 knots, armour consisted of a maximum 7,6cm/3” thick belt and a 2,5cm/1” deck and an armament of 1x2&5x1-15,2cm/6” Mk XII guns, 3-10,2cm/4” quick firing anti aircraft guns and 2x4-21” torpedo tubes.
5. The Almirante Cervera-class consisting of 3 ships, succeeded by the Canarias-class heavy cruisers, built launched 1922-1929, displacement 7.595 (standard)-9.385 (full load) tons, speed 33 knots, armour consisted of a maximum 7m6cm/3” thick belt, maximum 5,1cm/2” thick deck and with the conning tower protected by 15cm/6” and an armament of 3x2&2x1-15,2cm/6” guns, 4-10.2cm/4” guns, 3-4,7cm guns and 4x3-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.
6. Java-class light cruisers consisted of the Java, Sumatra and the never completed Celebes, preceded by the Holland protected cruiser-class and succeeded by the De Ruyter. Displacement 6.670 (standard)-8.087 (full load) tons, speed 31 knots, armour consisting of a 7,5cm/3” thick belt. 2,605cm thick deck. Conning tower protected by 12,5cm/4.9” and the guns by 10cm/3.9” gun shields. The armament consisted of 10-15cm/5.9’ Bofors guns, 6/8-4cm Bofors anti aircraft guns and 8-0.50” Browning machineguns. Java laid down on 31 May 1916, launched on 6 August 1921, commissioned on 1 May 1925 and sunk in the battle of the Java Sea on 27 February 1944 and the Sumatra laid down in 15 July 1916, launched on 29 December 1920, commissioned on 26 May 1926 and scuttled on 9 June 1944 off Normandy, France.

French destroyer Bourrasque performed well during trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1926 no. 4

An item referred to the Naval and Military Record dated 31 March 1926 reporting that the French 1.460 ton destroyer Bourrasque steamed during 8 hours with a medium speed 34,12 miles and achieved with maximum forced draft even 36,4 miles.(1)

Note
1. Of the Bourrasque-class, building ordered on 5 March 1923, laid down by Ateliers et Chantiers de France, Dunkirk, France on 19 November 1923, launched on 5 August 1925, completed and commissioned on 23 September 1926 and sunk during the evacuation of Dunkirk, on 30 May 1940. 

French destroyer Chacal executed trials with success according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1926 no. 4

An item referred to the Naval and Military Record dated 31 March 1926 reporting that the French 2.400 ton destroyer Chacal built by Penhoet and fitted out with Rateau turbines finally executed her trials with success after first undergoing boiler problems. (1)

Note
1. Of the Chacal-class, laid down at Ateliers et Chantiers de Saint-Nazaire, Penhoet, Saint Nazaire, France on 18 September 1923, launched on 27 September 1924, commissioned on 12 June 1926 and sunk by German aircraft off Boulogne-sur-Mer, France on 24 May 1940. 

French destroyer Jaguar hararassed by turbine problems during trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1926 no. 4

An item referred to the Naval and Military Record dated 31 March 1926 reporting that the French 2.400 tons destroyer Jaguar built at the navy yard at Lorient, France was to be delivered at the end of 1924. The delivery however was delayed by the continuous problems with damaged condensers. Finally she executed some very well trials until she was making with 45.000hp a speed of 35 miles during a strong contrary wind when suddenly the fore Rateau turbine fell out.(1)

Note
1. Of the Chacal-class, building ordered on 18 April 1922, laid down at Arsenal de Lorient on 24 August 1922, launched on 17 November 1923, completed on 7 October 1926, commissioned on 19 November 1926 and wrecked after she was torpedoed by a German E-boat while entering the harbour of Dunkirk, France on 23 May 1940. 

Sunday, 18 June 2017

Japanese LPG tanker Sumire Gas 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 June 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9723681, MMSI 374655000 and call sign 3FKR8. Built in 2016. According to maritime connector built by Kawasaki Sakaide Works, Sakaide, Japan and owned and managed by IINI Marine Services, Tokyo, Japan. 

Singapore oil products tanker (ex-Maguro 2010-2015) Hafnia Asia 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 June 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9467809, MMSI 566244000 and call sign 9V3329. Register owner Hafnia Tankers Shipbuilding 2 Singapore PTE, Ltd., Singapore, technical operator Donnelly Tanker Management Ltd,, Athens, Greece and commercial operator Strait Tankers Pte. Ltd., as agents for the owners.  According to maritime connector the Maguro, MMSI 538003826, Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, Built by STX Offshore&Shipbuilding, Jinhae, South Korea in 2010 and owned and managed by Prime Tanker Management, Athens, Greece. Ex-Majuro renamed 2 March 2015. 

Belgian reefer Chiquita België 1992-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 June 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9015204, MMSI 308121000 and call sign C6KD7. Owned and managed by Diamond Shipmanagement, Kapellen, Belgium. Built by Danyard, Frederikshavn, Denmark in 1992. 

Japanese bulk carrier Global Laguna 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 June 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9626730, MMSI 373102000 and call sign 3FWV4. Built by Cosco Nantong Shipyard, Nantong, China in 2012. Owned and managed by NYK Bulk&Projects Carriers, Tokyo, Japan. 

Dutch flagged razor shell cutter Creadan Lady (YE-243) 2004-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 June 2017

Netherlands-flagged. homeport Yerseke, IMO 9306055, MMSI 244870246 and call sign PBHV. Built in 2004. According to maritime connector Irelands-flagged, homeport Waterford, owned and managed by Woodstown Bay Shellfish, Waterford, Ireland and built by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellendam in 2004 and pennant W-243A. 

Belgian bottom trawling vessel Artevelde (B-65) 1986-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 June 2017

Belgium-flagged, homeport Blankenberge, MMSI 205265000 and call sign OPCM. Built by SV Scap, Oostende, Belgium in 1986. 

Curacao container ship (ex-CSAV Caribe 2007-2008) Balkan 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 June 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9358890, MMSI 256600000 and call sign 9HKY8. Ex-Csav Caribe renamed July 2008. Owned by New World Shipping, Curacao and managed by Amazsa. Bilbao, Spain. Built by Avic Weihai Shipyard, Weihai, China in 2007. 

Greek bulk carrier Galapagos 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 June 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9473169, MMSI 248146000 and call sign 9HA2204. Owned by Primco and managed by Sea Traders, Athens, Greece. Built by Jiangnan Shipyard Group, Shanghai, China in 2010. 

Saturday, 17 June 2017

Italian battleships Littorio and Vittorio Veneto laid down according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

Italian Roma

With our thanks to Enrico

French Dunkerque

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht dated 3 November 1934 reporting that the laying down of the keels for the battleships Vittorio Veneto and Littoral (1) under great enthusiasm at Trieste and Genoa was a glorious cardinal point for the Italian naval policy. A large new building program was realized consisting of 7-10.000 ton cruisers, 6-5.000 ton unprotected and 6-6.000/7.000 ton protected light cruisers, 15-1.600 ton destroyers, 32-1.200 ton destroyers, 4-625 ton destroyers, 26-770/900 ton submarines and 9-1.350 ton submarines. Except for the submarines and destroyers was this similar to the French building. The two new battleships superior to the French Dunkerque and Strasbourg (2) however would give Italy a large advance. It would force England, USA, Japan and France to built 35.000 ton battleships equivalent to the Italian ones.

Notes
1. Of the Littorio or Vittorio Veneto-class consisting of the Vittorio Veneto (laid down 28 October 1934), Littoral (laid down 28 October 1934), Roma (laid down 18 September 1039)and Impero (laid down 14 May 1938, not completed) with a main armament of 3x3-38,1cm/15.0” L/50 guns and a displacement of 40.724 (standard)-45.236 (full load) tons.
2. Of the Dunkerque-class fast battleships. This class was preceded by the Bretagne-class, succeeded by the Richelieu-class and an answer to the German so-called pocket battleships of the Deutschland-class (for instance the Graf Spee!). The Dunkerque was laid down on 24 December 1932, launched on 2 October 1935, commissioned on 1 May 1937, scuttled on 27 November 1942 at Toulon, partly scrapped by German and Italian forces, hit by Allied air attacks, refloated of what was left in 1945 and sold to be broken up in 1958. The Strasbourg was laid down in November 1934, launched on 12 December 1936, scuttled at Toulon on 27 November 1942, refloated on 17 July 1943 by the Italian navy but after Italy capitulated in German hands, handed over to France on 1 April 1944, sunk as a result of an American air attack on 18 August 1944, refloated on 1 October 1944 and used as a target for trials with underwater explosives, renamed Q45 on 22 March 1955 and sold on 27 May of the same year to be broken up. Dimensions of these ships were 215,1 x 31,1 x 8,7 metres. Main armament 2x4-33cm/13” 50cal Modèle 1931 guns. 

Italy started building battleships Littorio and Vittorio Veneto according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

Roma

With our thanks to Enrico

An item referred to the magazine Rivista Marittima dated October 1934 reporting that according to the Washington Naval Treaty Italy was allowed to built 1-35.000 ton battleship in 1927 and a second one in 1929. The 35.000 tons Littorio and Veneto now under construction were the first battleships laid down in Italy since 1914. The designs were already a considerable time ago prepared. The maximum speed was as to be more as 28 miles. The main armament were 38,1cm guns with a fire range of 40 kilometres.(1)

Note
1. Of the Littorio or Vittorio Veneto-class consisting of the Vittorio Veneto (laid down 28 October 1934), Littoral (laid down 28 October 1934), Roma (laid down 18 September 1039)and Impero (laid down 14 May 1938, not completed) with a main armament of 3x3-38,1cm/15.0” L/50 guns and a displacement of 40.724 (standard)-45.236 (full load) tons.